Revelando, imortalizando histórias e talentos
27.5.15

As the Cannes Film Festival draws to a close, the question critics are asking is whether Todd Haynes's coming-of-age lesbian drama, Carol, will take the prestigious Palme D'Or.

 

Rooney Mara and Cate Blanchett embark
on an illicit lesbian affair

Adapted from the 1952 novel The Price of Salt, by Patricia Highsmith, this tale of two women, of different ages and backgrounds, falling in love in post-war New York City, caused ripples of shock when it was first published. And even in 2015, the film version, starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, has become a major talking point of the festival.

"Todd has made a beautiful film," is the opinion of Blanchett, who also served as a producer on the project.

"I think Carol's appeal is that it captures exactly that feeling of intoxication you have when you fall in love. You would get that heart-stopping experience whether it was two women, two men or a man and a woman. "In a way it's front and centre of the film that it's two women who fall in love, but in other ways it's totally irrelevant. It's the experience of love which gives the film its power."

In 1952, homosexuality was illegal, and Blanchett's character, Carol Aird, faces losing custody of her daughter in a bitter divorce battle because of her affair with another woman. Blanchett calls the premise of the original novel by Highsmith as "arresting and unusual - the idea of love as a criminal act".

Blanchett, who makes her directing debut later this year with an adaptation of the Herman Koch novel The Dinner, notes that Carol offers "strong female characters for myself and Rooney Mara to play". "I see this as a very special film, a real labour of love, a movie of no budget and immense ambition.

EDITORIAS:
link da notíciaBy Equipe formasemeios, às 00:23  comentar

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